Gallery Show: 蒼山日菜と日本の切り絵作家展 [Hina Aoyama and Cut Paper Artists of Japan Exhibition] @ Ichiba, Matsue

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Gallery Show:  蒼山日菜と日本の切り絵作家展 [Hina Aoyama and Cut Paper Artists of Japan Exhibition] @ Ichiba, Matsue Gallery Show:  蒼山日菜と日本の切り絵作家展 [Hina Aoyama and Cut Paper Artists of Japan Exhibition] @ Ichiba, Matsue

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蒼山日菜と日本の切り絵作家展 [Hina Aoyama and Cut Paper Artists of Japan Exhibition] @ Ichiba, Matsue including cut paper artwork by Patrick GannonClick the image for detailed PDF / 詳細のPDFは画像をクリックしてください

A few years ago, while I was in the midst of relocating from Tokyo to Fukuoka, I had the privilege of exhibiting at the Kirie of the World in Japan Exhibition at the Fujikawa Kirie Art Museum. One of the artists represented there was the wonderful Hina Aoyama. Not only is Hina an amazingly talented paper cutter, she is also a really impressive, charismatic person. If you ever have the chance to talk to her, don’t you dare be shy.

Ms. Aoyama has invited me, along with five other cut paper artists to exhibit with her at the Ichibata Department Store, Matsue Branch from December 27th until January 12th.

The artwork will range from the impossibly small and delicate to the colorful and bold. It’s an exhibition not to miss. I’ve even got a few pieces in the show that have never been exhibited before (20 pieces total, so it’s gonna be a big show).

Which reminds me: If you’ve never been to Japan, now is a great time to come. Sure, the weather isn’t as warm as it could be and the cherry blossoms won’t blossom for a few months, but the Yen is really weak right now. Coming from overseas has never been more economical (I can’t vouch for airfare prices).

As much as I’d like to attend the exhibition, Matsue is a pretty good trek from Fukuoka. If anything changes, I’ll be sure to blog about it.

the details:

蒼山日菜と日本の切り絵作家展 [Hina Aoyama and Cut Paper Artists of Japan Exhibition]

dates: Sat. December 27, 2014 – Mon. January 12, 2015

times: 10:00am – 7:00pm [ends 6pm Dec. 31st, closed Jan. 1st, ends 5pm last day]

place: Ichibata Dept. Store, Matsue branch, 6th Floor, (Matsue Asahi-machi)

Advance Tickets: Adults 500円(same day 700円)• JHS students 400円(same day 500円)• elementary school students or younger enter free

contact: Sanninchuoshinposha Regional Promotion Bureau Culture and Sports Division • telephone 0852 (32) 3415

Hina Aoyama : official website
venue: website
directions: map

日付: 2014年12月27日(土)〜 2015年1月12日(月)
時間: 午前10時 〜 午後7時[ 1月1日は店休 • 詳細はポスターをご覧下さい]
住所: 一畑百貨店松江店6階催会場(松江市朝日町)
前売り券: 大人500円(当日700円)• 中高生400円(当日500円)• 小学生以下無料
問い合わせ: 山陰中央新報社地域振興局文化・スポーツ事業部=電話0852(32)3415

主催: 山陰中央新報社/協力 一畑百貨店

蒼山日菜 : official website
会場: ホームページ
アクセス: 地図

蒼山日菜と日本の切り絵作家展 [Hina Aoyama and Cut Paper Artists of Japan Exhibition] @ Ichiba, Matsue including cut paper artwork by Patrick GannonClick the image for detailed PDF / 詳細のPDFは画像をクリックしてください

蒼山日菜と日本の切り絵作家展Click the image for detailed PDF / 詳細のPDFはこちら

Guest Shots: The 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennale 2014The 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennale 2014, all artwork courtesy of the Fukuoka Asian Art Museum, Fukuoka, Japan

In moving from Tokyo – the center of population, politics, business, and culture in Japan – I had resigned myself to living with a dearth of musical performances, galleries, museum exhibitions, and global food. Imagine how happy I have been, these past few years, to be completely and utterly wrong. I revel in my misconceptions at every possible opportunity. Opportunities have been plentiful.

If you have the chance to bounce through Fukuoka before November 30, 2014, I recommend you stop by the Fukuoka Asian Art Museum to check out The 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennale 2014.

Guest Shots: The 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennale 2014Another Realm (Horse), Min Thein Sung

The exhibition collects artwork of every possible genre; sculpture, painting, animation, video, multi/mixed-media, video games, collage, and more. What could have been a hodgepodge of disparate and incompatible ideas instead feels tied together by a strong social conscience as this group of mostly young Asian artists examine the present and look ahead to a myriad possible futures. Employed throughout is – and this may be my favorite element – a seriously quirky sense of humor.

Guest Shots: The 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennale 2014Uterusman, Lu Yang

Here are a bunch of links to info about the show and its artists:

Guest Shots: The 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennale 2014Spine, Sunil Sigdel

Guest Shots: The 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennale 2014深い森の誰も知らない国, Tanaka Chisato

Guest Shots: The 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennale 2014アナハバナシ展, Yoshinaga Koutaku

魔女&ドクロス展 [Witches & Skulls Exhibition] including cut paper artwork by Patrick Gannon

There was a time when nearly every piece of art I made had a skull hidden (or blatantly smashed) in it. I’ve always had a special place in my heart for symbols and iconography, and the human skull is an especially powerful one: mortality, danger, and heavy metal all wrapped up in one bony dome.

It’s always nice to be asked back to a venue. I’m happy to announce that a small selection of my artwork (alongside some prints, postcards, etc.) will be at Arts Rush Gallery once again, beginning Wednesday, November 11th, through the first of December. Eight artists will be sharing their work with the denizens of Tokyo, inspired by skulls, witches, and crosses. For all art lovers, beautiful chaos will be on display for 2 weeks.

the details:

魔女&ドクロス展 [Witches & Skulls Exhibition]

dates: Wed. November 12 – Mon. December 1, 2014

times: 11:30am – 8:00pm [doors shut 5:00pm on Mondays, closed Tuesdays]

place: Arts Rush, 1F 2-14-10 Ebisu-Nishi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 〒150-0021
tel: 03-3770-6786
gallery: website
directions: English map
directions: 地図

日付: 2014年11月12日(水)〜 12月1日(火)
時間: 午前11:30時~午後20時 [ 月曜日は午後5時閉店 火曜日定休日 ]
住所: 〒150-0021 東京都渋谷区恵比寿西2-14-10 トゥワォン代官山103
電話: 03-3770-6786
ギャラリー: ホームページ
アクセス: 地図

魔女&ドクロス展 [Witches & Skulls Exhibition] including cut paper artwork by Patrick Gannon

2015 cut paper art calendar campaign now available for pre-order

It turns out, despite my being a denier for years, that time is, in fact, real.

The planet does indeed spin wackily on its axis while hurling itself in an elliptical orbit around a gargantuan nuclear inferno. The future materializes as the present which, in turn turn turn, ekes away into the past. We all walk in the fourth dimension.

This is good news for the 2015 Cut Paper Art Calendar. Not only is it chock-full of paper art, but it helps people keep track of what day it is. Bonus!

Since returning from my trip to the US, wherein I visited family (Hi, Mom!), my nose has been pressed hard against the proverbial grindstone, finessing into existence the rewards from the Kickstarter campaign…

…By the way, the 2015 Cut Paper Art Calendar Kickstarter Campaign was a Success! Thanks to all of the good, art-loving folks all around the world, 2015 will be a year full of cut-paper calendars, lasercuts, t-shirts, etc.

The calendar is available now for Pre-Order in the shop. We hope to begin shipping as soon as possible. T-shirts & LaserCuts will become available in due time as well.

2015 cut paper art calendar campaign now available for pre-order 2015 Cut Paper Art Calendar – Color Proof

2015 cut paper art calendar campaign now available for pre-order Postcards, new & reprints – Color Proof

cut paper art calendar campaign on Kickstarter.com

The 2015 Cut Paper Art Calendar Campaign on Kickstarter

Running from Now until October 3, 2014

The 2015 Cut Paper Art Calendar: Your annual recommended supply of paper, art, and imagination. Now with sheep!

That exciting time of year is upon us once again, when the Cut Paper Art Calendar Campaign roars alive on Kickstarter.

Last year was a huge year for us, none of which would have been possible without the support of art fans around the world.

We’re asking for your support once again, and have been hard at work conjuring up awesome reward bundles and seriously stupendous stretch goals. Postcards, Giclée Prints, Lasercuts, original artwork, and possibly much more are being offered to our wonderful backers.

I’m a little proud of our goofy video too, for which I learned some simple animation. You will believe a doll can speak!

cut paper art calendar campaign on Kickstarter.com

How It Works

The basic goal is $2200 USD (Reached!). That amount will cover the cost of printing 100 calendars, shipping materials and postage. I’d love to print more, but that will depend on how many calendars get snapped up. The deadline is October 3, 2014. The Kickstarter system is pretty straightforward:

You CHECK out the Project and decide that you adore it.
You PLEDGE money – however much you choose.
You pick a REWARD.
Then you WAIT.
The project has already reached it’s GOAL, so your credit card or Paypal account will be charged the amount you pledged after the campaign ends.
I’ll CONTACT you for your contact info., your choice of rewards (where applicable), etc.
Then I’ll SHIP out the reward(s) you chose.
ENJOY.

Stretch Goals

Should we be lucky enough to surpass our goal, it will allow us to refill our supplies of rewards, knock out a bigger print run of calendars, PLUS we’ve got some very cool ideas to make this project even more fun!

Reached!, reprinting Postcard Pack 4

Reached!!, Stickers Thank-you gift. As backers increase, the stickers shall get bigger and more numerous (I’d like to offer 3)

Reached!!! the Year of the Sheep (er…it’s a Ram) limited edition Laser Cut Print. see Rewards below

At $8,000 – T-Shirt! We’ve spent the last 2 months talking to t-shirt printers all around Fukuoka. We’ve found one we like, and we really really want to put a ram on a tee. Our plan is to do a print run of 100; of course, if we get a lot of orders we’ll increase that number. We’re looking at printing a full-color direct-to-garment design. The color of the tee will depend on which looks best. More info as we get close to the goal.

cut paper art calendar campaign on Kickstarter.comCut-by-cut making of the Year of the Sheep LaserCut Art

cut paper art calendar campaign on Kickstarter.comThe Ram t-shirt prototype . The design may wrap around…

Guest Shots: HokusaiHokusai, all artwork courtesy of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and the Kitakyushu Museum of Art, Riverside Gallery

It’s a terrible cliche to say that it’s not the destination, but rather the journey that expands our horizons. However, I don’t know a cliche that explains what happens when one plans to enjoy a long journey gets shaken up enough to change one’s destination.

Train tickets in hand, we set out obscenely early on a Friday morning with a scheme to slowly make our way up the western coast of Japan, through Yamaguchi prefecture to Izumo and Matsue cities in Shimane prefecture to take in the Izumo-taisha temple and a road filled with statues based on Shigeru Mizuki’s Gegege no Kitarō in Sakaiminato.

Guest Shots: HokusaiHokusai musician at the Kitakyushu Museum of Art, Riverside Gallery

The universe, or at least the weeping clouds, had other plans. Only about one hour north of Fukuoka, in the city of Karatsu, the horrid weather conspired to strand us. All the local trains that we had planned to ride for the next 10 hours while enjoying the scenery were flooded out, bogged down, or simply refused to go forward.

Lucky indeed were we, that we had heard of the Hokusai exhibition at the the Kitakyushu Museum of Art, Riverside Gallery.

Curated by the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, many of these pieces have not been in Japan since their creation. It was a truly spectacular show, including all of Hokusai’s Thirty-Six Views of Mt. Fuji (I think… I lost count), his waterfall series, flowers, a smattering of yokai, and other works spanning his lengthy career.

Guest Shots: HokusaiMy Booty: the Exhibition Catalog, Ticket, and Mini-poster

While the exhibition is no longer in Kitakyushu, it opens on 9/13 in Tokyo. I couldn’t recommend this exhibition more strongly. Hokusai is a huge influence on my style and my appreciation of Japanese art, and seeing his work in person for the first time was exhilarating.

English Website

Japanese Website

Guest Shots: HokusaiExhibition Poster

妖し展 [Ayashi Exhibition] including cut paper artwork by Patrick Gannon

The Japanese / English dictionary I use defines 妖し [Ayashi] precisely in the following way:

attractive, bewitching, calamity

I cannot think of a better description for art, and the process of making art. Both the act and the result seem to be charming chaos (verb/noun) to create charming chaos (adjective/noun). Attempts to impose order, logic, or structure are all so much fairy dust and illusion.

It is fortuitous then, that such artwork is perfect for Arts Rush’s 妖し展 [Ayashi Exhibition], opening this Wednesday the 13th of August. I’m thrilled to have been invited back for my second group show at Arts Rush (Neiro was the first). 8 artists in total will be showing a wide variety of strange, ominous, and beguiling artwork in a variety of mediums and techniques. I’m confident that the exhibition will be mysteriously amazing (or amazingly mysterious!).

Suspiciously, I shall not be in attendance this time. I hope that you will be, though, to witness the weirdness and beauty for your self.

Artists include:

the details:

妖し展 [Ayashi Exhibition]

dates: Wed. August 13 – Mon. August 25, 2014

times: 11:30am – 8:00pm [doors shut 5:00pm on Mondays, closed Tuesdays]

place: Arts Rush, 1F 2-14-10 Ebisu-Nishi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 〒150-0021
tel: 03-3770-6786
gallery: website
directions: English map
directions: 地図

日付: 2014年8月13日(木)〜 8月25日(火)
時間: 午前11:30時~午後20時 [ 月曜日は午後5時閉店 火曜日定休日 ]
住所: 〒150-0021 東京都渋谷区恵比寿西2-14-10 トゥワォン代官山103
電話: 03-3770-6786
ギャラリー: ホームページ
アクセス: 地図

妖し展 [Ayashi Exhibition] including cut paper artwork by Patrick Gannon

The Coming Together of the Pulse & the Tremor cut paper art on kasuri textile by Patrick Gannon

size: 13.8 x 7.3 inches / 350 x 185mm
medium: cut and torn washi and chiyogami paper on Kurume Kasuri Textile
click the image or here to Turn up the volume

It doesn’t happen very often, but some days the ideas come almost too easily. The Coming Together of the Pulse & the Tremor, for instance, is a collaboration between my cut paper artwork and the gorgeous traditional indigo and patterns of Tsuru-san’s Kurume Kasuri textile.

Mere moments after I’d been invited to work together on the exhibition and incorporate the fabric into my work (a first!), I knew what the theme of the artwork would be: Collaboration!

It’s like walking through a low doorway and banging your head on revelation.

After all, the ways in which people and concepts relate to each other, positively, negatively or ambiguously, has often been a theme of interest to me. Internally or externally, strengths may build upon strengths in a harmony of action and thought. Discord detracts from the whole, pitching into chaos. All in much the same way that the correct colors and layers of paper can, with skill and luck and intent, come together to create an image; then inside that image, a flood of emotions and ideas.

At the same time that I was tossing around ideas for this piece, I was also working on some art for the Neiro (Tone) exhibition at Arts Rush Gallery in Tokyo. The ideas of tone and collaboration bounced off each other and swirled together into a semi-musical concoction based on images of sound waves and heart beats.

Portrait of Lady in Green cut paper art by Patrick Gannon Detail: flautist

Portrait of Lady in Green cut paper art by Patrick Gannon Detail: acoustic telepathy

The Fiercest Raveling cut paper artwork by Patrick Gannonsize: 8.5 x 23.8 inches (approx.) / 215 x 605 mm (depth 20 mm)
medium: cut paper, washi and chiyogami on stained wood

While I cannot claim to be mother (or father) of dragons, your confusion would be forgiven based on how many have slithered through PaperCuts recently; whether forming from the foam of a waterfall or relaxing at O-hanami.

Truth be told, I was more than a little nervous to start drawing these reptilian beasts. It’s not that I don’t like the wyrms, mind you. I do. They’re charming. It’s more that I really, really, very much didn’t want to make a bad dragon. And it is so very easy to draw a bad dragon. In junior high school, I scribbled out dozens of terrible drakes blasting fire at adventurers, burning villages, or rending hapless knights to bits with claw and teeth. There are many brilliant dragons in art both old and new, but like their equally fantastic cousins the unicorn, it’s more than a little bit of a challenge to make these beasts one’s own. How does an artist imbue such a long-standing symbol with personal meaning?

It helps that the Cats & Dragons Exhibition, for which this piece was originally conceived, had such a unique theme. It takes a pretty fervent imagination to juxtapose kittens and reptiles so massive they would make a t-rex soil it’s undies.

Over the course of a few months, I went through a dozen different concepts of varying levels of awfulness before alighting on an idea, or rather a query, that made my brain grin. Where does reality begin and fantasy end?

Which is more real: the solid, physical and mundane, or imagination, spirit, and raw emotion?

The cats at the bottom of the piece are connected to the dragon, cobbled together from tenuous strands. Are they the earthly avatars of the great beast? Or is this colorful drake nothing more than the playful fighting spirit of a litter of kittens. Also yes, the visual pun about cats and string is entirely intentional.

The Fiercest Raveling, sketch cut paper artwork by Patrick Gannon

Visually, it is always fun to play around with solidity and intangibility. The dragon has weight and density to it. The cats are monochromatic, slightly immaterial; they are inconspicuous relative to the colorful bulk overhead.

The color of the wood is inspired by traditional Japanese 屏風 (Byōbu) screens, which were often painted on top of gold leaf.

As an added bit of whimsical symbolism, the eyes of the frolicking felines are reflected in the sharply ovoid shape of the dragon’s scales.

The Fiercest Raveling, detail cut paper artwork by Patrick Gannondetail: teeth and claws

The Fiercest Raveling, detail cut paper artwork by Patrick Gannondetail: kitten rumble

The Fiercest Raveling, detail cut paper artwork by Patrick Gannoniridescence

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